The Wildlife Conservation Society, founded in 1895, has the clear mission to save wildlife and wild places across the globe.

In the news

July 20, 2017

Globally Endangered Masked Finfoot Nest recorded in Cambodia

Conservationists from the Ministry of Environment (MoE), Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and local communities found the first Globally Endangered Masked Finfoot nest for four years on the Memay River in the Kulen Promtep Wildlife Sanctuary (KPWS) in Preah Vihear Province. This site is the only confirmed breeding location in Cambodia for this very rare species.

Masked Finfoot (Heliopais personatus) is listed on IUCN Red List as Globally Endangered, because its global population is declining at an alarming rate. This riverine species lives only in Bangladesh, Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Lao People's Democratic Republic, Malaysia, Myanmar, Singapore, Thailand, and Viet Nam. Its global population is less than 1,000 individuals, while little is known about numbers in Cambodia.

“After educating local communities about the Masked Finfoot, the Research team worked together with Community Protected Area committee and other local community members to search for the species. We then found a Masked Finfoot on the nest near the Memay River in KPWS, Preah Vihear Province,” said Rours Vann, MoE/WCS Research Team Leader in KPWS.
July 18, 2017

WCS Supports Decision by Ministry of Mines and Energy to Stop Sand Dredging in Sre Ambel River System

WCS supports the Ministry of Mines and Energy’s (MME) decision to stop all types of sand dredging activities in Sre Amble River system in Koh Kong Province and ban all export to abroad. The circular and declaration were issued on 10 July 2017.

This decision reflects strong commitment and efforts from MME in avoiding the negative impacts from sand dredging activities on the environment, fisheries, local communities as well as the protection of biodiversity, including Royal Turtles.

Sre Ambel River system is a very important conservation site because it is the only place in Cambodia where Royal Turtles, the Cambodia’s national reptile, can be found.

Publications


Keo Seima REDD__Newsletter_April-June 2017

Author(s): Mengey Eng
Year: 2017

WCS_Newsletter_ June_2017

Author(s): Mengey Eng
Year: 2017

WCS_Newsletter_May_2017

Author(s): Mengey Eng
Year: 2017

WCS_Newsletter_Mar_2017

Author(s): Mengey Eng
Year: 2017

WCS_Newsletter_ Feb_2017

Author(s): Mengey Eng
Year: 2017

WCS_Newsletter_Jan_2017

Author(s): Mengey Eng
Year: 2017

Email from:
 
Email to:
 
Message:


The person you email to will see the details you enter in the Form field and will be given you IP address for auditing purposes